Cambridge IVF

Cambridge IVF

Kefford House, 2 Maris Lane, Trumpington, Cambridge, CB2 9LG, UK
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Phone: 01223 349 010
Fax: 01223 348 202
cambridgeivf@addenbrookes.nhs.uk

Opening hours:

  • 8:00 - 17:00 Monday - Friday Weekend - on call cover over weekend + Bank Holidays

Overview

  • Female doctor available

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Patient feedback

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HFEA inspection

Licensed since:
July 1992
Licensed renewed:
October 2013

Is it for you?

Overview of services offered:

  • Donors:
    • ICSI with donor sperm
    • IVF with donor sperm
  • Storage:
    • Stores eggs
    • Stores embryos
    • Stores sperm

View treatments and services

Treatments for:

  • Treats NHS patients
  • Treats private patients

Waiting lists

Always confirm with the clinic!

Treatment NHS Private
IVFApprox 1-2 weeks
DI Approx 1-2 weeks

Success rates

This clinic re-opened in October 2011. To view pregnancy data click here.

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The information that we publish on our website is a snap shot of data provided to us by licensed centres at a particular time. This information may be subject to change as individual centres notify us of amendments. Before publication, we perform a preliminary validation process on the data, and ask centres to confirm its accuracy, for which they remain responsible.

Hints and tips

ICSI

Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) involves injecting a single sperm directly into an egg in order to fertilise it. The fertilised egg (embryo) is then transferred to the woman’s womb.

Insemination

The best quality sperm are selected then inserted into the womb at the woman’s most fertile time. This can be with partner (IUI) or donor sperm (DI).

IVF

In vitro fertilisation (IVF) literally means ‘fertilisation in glass’ giving us the familiar term ‘test tube baby’.

During the IVF process, eggs are removed from the ovaries and fertilised with sperm in the laboratory. The fertilised egg (embryo) is later placed in the woman’s womb.

GIFT

A procedure in which eggs are retrieved from a woman, mixed with sperm and immediately replaced in one or other of the woman's fallopian tubes so that they fertilise inside the body (in vivo).

PGD

Pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is a technique that enables people with a specific inherited condition in their family to avoid passing it on to their children. It involves checking the genes of embryos created through IVF for this genetic condition.

PGS

PGS (also known as aneuploidy screening) involves checking the chromosomes of embryos conceived by in vitro fertilisation (IVF) or intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) for common abnormalities. This avoids having abnormal embryos transferred to the womb during IVF or ICSI.

Consistent with national average live birth rate

There is no statistical difference between this clinic’s success rate and the national average. Any small difference between the clinic and the national average may just be down to chance.

Above national average live birth rate

This clinic’s success rate is significantly better than the national average. We can be confident that the difference between the clinic and the national average is unlikely to have occurred by chance.

There are a range of reasons why a clinic may have a higher success rate. Clinics have different treatment policies and practices. Some clinics may treat proportionately fewer patients with difficult fertility problems than the national average, which may increase the clinic’s success rate.

Below national average live birth rate

This clinic’s success rate is significantly lower than the national average. We can be confident that the difference between the clinic and the national average is unlikely to have occurred by chance.

There are a range of reasons why a clinic may have a lower success rate. Clinics have different treatment policies and practices. Some clinics may treat more patients with difficult fertility problems than the national average, which may lower the clinic’s success rate.

HFEA targets for single births

The HFEA introduced a policy in January 2009 to minimise the proportion of multiple births following IVF and ICSI treatment. The policy promotes the birth of a single baby as the safest outcome of fertility treatment.

The HFEA has set progressively higher targets over recent years. From January 2009 to March 2010 the target for single births was 76% (ie a maximum of 24% multiple births). From April 2010 to March 2011 the target was 80%. From April 2011 to September 2012 the target was 85% and from October 2012 onwards the target is 90%.

The clinic data we present on Choose a Fertility Clinic relate to treatments which took place before the current 90% target. The target displayed is the most appropriate for comparison with the data in the tables.

Proportion of single live births

This is the proportion of single births resulting from all types of embryo transfers at this clinic (IVF, ICSI, fresh and frozen). This data has been presented in this form from May 2013.

IVF and ICSI

In vitro fertilisation (IVF) literally means ‘fertilisation in glass’ giving us the familiar term ‘test tube baby’. During the IVF process, eggs are removed from the ovaries and fertilised with sperm in the laboratory. The fertilised egg (embryo) is later placed in the woman’s womb.

Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) involves injecting a single sperm directly into an egg in order to fertilise it. The fertilised egg (embryo) is then transferred to the woman’s womb.

Intra Uterine Insemination (IUI) cycles

The HFEA only started collecting data on IUI cycles with partner sperm in July 2007. Therefore the number of IUI cycles presented here is only for the period from July –December 2007. We only collect pregnancy data on IUI cycles not live birth data.

DI

Donor insemination (DI) uses sperm from a donor to help the woman become pregnant. Sperm donors are screened for sexually transmitted diseases and some genetic disorders. In DI, sperm from the donor is placed into the neck of the womb (cervix) at the time when the woman ovulates.